Annie Hall

Marilyn Fabe has been a lecturer in Berkeley's Film Studies Program since 1976. She will sign copies of Closely Watched Films: An Introduction to the Art of Narrative Film Technique (UC Press, 2004).

In Annie Hall, Woody Allen's childhood alter-ego Alvie Singer attributes his depression to the fear that “the universe is expanding.” “Why is that your business?” his mother famously retorts. Marilyn Fabe has been making cinema-its theories, ploys, and pleasures-all of our business for over thirteen years in the UC Berkeley course she founded, Film 50: History of Cinema, which plays each spring semester to a packed house of Berkeley students and PFA audience members (see page 10). Closely Watched Films: An Introduction to the Art of Narrative Film Technique grew out of Fabe's smart and engaging lectures, in which she inspires viewers to do a close reading of individual films in order to get the big picture. In her chapter “Film and Postmodernism: Woody Allen's Annie Hall,” she shows how the universe of the self is breaking up, and why we shouldn't worry.

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