War and Peace

June 1–15, 2019

Sergei Bondarchuk’s Academy Award–winning adaptation of Tolstoy’s revered novel, following good-hearted Pierre, battle-scarred Andrei, and tempestuous Natasha through the tumult of the Napoleonic Wars, was hailed by Roger Ebert as “the definitive epic of all time”; it demands to be seen on the big screen. Part I moves between ballroom and battlefield, hinging on the disastrous Battle of Austerlitz.

 

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Past Films

  • War and Peace, Part IV: Pierre Bezukhov

    • Thursday, June 6 7 PM
    • Saturday, June 8 7:30 PM
    • Saturday, June 15 3:30 PM
    Sergei Bondarchuk
    USSR, 1966

    Digital Restoration

    The final installment in the four-part epic opens as the Russian army retreats, leaving Moscow in flames; it closes as the city rebuilds, and life and love begin again.

  • War and Peace, Part III: The Year 1812

    • Wednesday, June 5 7 PM
    • Saturday, June 8 5:30 PM
    • Saturday, June 15 1:30 PM
    Sergei Bondarchuk
    USSR, 1966

    Digital Restoration

    In Part III of War and Peace, the emphasis is on the war: it is 1812 and Napoleon’s armies are crossing into Russia. Pierre visits the battlefield as a casual observer and finds himself in the midst of chaos, while Andrei rediscovers his love of life through a brush with death.

  • War and Peace, Part II: Natasha Rostova

    • Saturday, June 1 8 PM
    • Sunday, June 2 6:30 PM
    • Sunday, June 9 4:30 PM
    Sergei Bondarchuk
    USSR, 1966

    Digital Restoration

     

    In the second part of Bondarchuk’s epic adaptation, young Natasha becomes engaged to military man Andrei, but his protracted absence leaves her vulnerable.

  • War and Peace, Part I: Andrei Bolkonsky

    • Saturday, June 1 4:30 PM
    • Sunday, June 2 2:30 PM
    • Saturday, June 8 2 PM
    Sergei Bondarchuk
    USSR, 1966

    Digital Restoration

    Sergei Bondarchuk’s Academy Award–winning adaptation of Tolstoy’s revered novel, following good-hearted Pierre, battle-scarred Andrei, and tempestuous Natasha through the tumult of the Napoleonic Wars, was hailed by Roger Ebert as “the definitive epic of all time”; it demands to be seen on the big screen.